Episode III

Episode III of This Ain’t No Disco features artists Rusangano Family, Lisa O’Neill, Radie and Darragh from Lankum, RSAG, Stephen James Smith, Brigid Mae Power and the imitable Peter Broderick. We could not have made this episode without the kind help of the arts spaces Dlight Studios Dublin and The Back Loft.

Website links to artists featured:

Brigid Mae Power  / Radie Peat’s Rue and the band Lankum / Lisa O’Neill / Rusangano Family / Peter Broderick / RSAG / Stephen James Smith

Article taken from Creative Ireland Website, Ireland.ie

Beautifully shot and evoking a palpable connection between song, artist and place, the highly-anticipated third episode of online Irish music showcase, This Ain’t No Disco, has been exclusively released.

The online iteration of radio presenter, DJ, filmmaker, photographer and cultural curator Donal Dineen’s beloved 90s music TV show, No Disco, This Ain’t No Disco was unveiled by Dineen and filmmaker Myles O’Reilly last year to considerable acclaim.

Harnessing the internet’s vast scope as a broadcast medium, over 250,000 views have amassed for episode one alone. A dynamic showcase of performance, collaboration and conversation with the scores of under-represented musical visionaries Ireland boasts today, episode three features innovative live performances captured in and outdoors across city settings, rural enclaves and riverside shores.

Limerick’s beat aficionados Rusangano Family and Kilkenny’s ever-atmospheric Rarely Seen Above Ground (RSAG) perform to a backdrop of immersive visuals created by host Donal Dineen. While Cavan wonder Lisa O’Neill performs perched in her tour van among the gulls at Dublin’s Great South Wall.

Lankum’s Radie Peat and Darragh Lynch take to a rooftop to perform a captivating rendition of some traditional folk, before Peat and Lisa O’Neill discuss pioneering Irish traditional singer Margaret Barry and duet on Barry’s affecting classic Factory Girl.

It’s a dynamic showcase of performance, collaboration and conversation with the scores of under-represented musical visionaries Ireland boasts today.

Bridget Mae Power performs at her cottage’s piano while David Allred and Peter Broderick sing a cappella on the shores of Lough Corrib. And the acclaimed Stephen James Smith, standing atop an ancient megalithic cairn in Kerry, recites a compelling new poem.

A magnetic and evocative representation of Irish music’s rude health, sit back and marvel at our creative and cultural cup positively overflowing.

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